A Normal Day

Most people have what they consider a normal day. A normal day is something I don’t think I know very well. My day is filled with excitement and energy from the minute I get to the office. I work in a program that assists people who are homeless and have both substance abuse and mental health concerns. It’s an energetic place to work and very challenging as well. It has it’s rewards and it’s drawbacks, but normal it is not.

My day starts with a meeting reviewing all of our clients. That’s the most normal part of the whole day. We have a team that works with our clients and this team is very strong willed and determined. Both qualities that are needed to work with our clients, but on the other hand, it can be difficult to work as a team when each person is so determined and strong-willed. But I love to watch each person interact with our clients. It’s amazing how each person has their own approach and I learn something from them each day. We also cooperate well when it comes to stepping in when concerns arise or when we feel we aren’t doing enough to help them with their situation. You definitely can say it’s not dull at my job.

Once I finish at my job, I go to one of two places, either my house or my boyfriends house. We both currently live with our families (parents, children and sometimes grandchildren). Living in multi-generational households makes it interesting as well.

 

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My parents generation has strong beliefs based on faith and respect. Additionally, they do not like being in debt and worry a lot about having enough money to make it through. Additionally, they want to help their kids and grand-kids as much as possible. This make a push-pull effect on them every day. They do everything to help and then worry that they don’t have enough money after they have given of their money to assist. Worry warts is their middle name.

My generation is one that is in full debt (usually up to our eyeballs). We worry that our kids are growing up right and that they can stand on their own. We punished them when necessary but showed them love as well. They also received a lot more stuff than we did as kids and spent a lot more time indoors playing. Play dates were arranged instead of just happened. We also concern ourselves that our grand-kids are getting everything they need to be responsible, loving, considerate children and adults. So we step in when we feel it is necessary by pulling our kids to the side and talking to them. Talk therapy is our middle name.

In retrospect, our children, who are now adults, have a different view on life as well. They are not in debt yet, but they live paycheck to paycheck. They are trying to find their way and raise their children their own way. They teach their kids to be responsible and punish them when they feel its necessary. They hate it when we “spoil” our grand-kids, but understand that it’s just the way we are as grandparents. They are still finding their way, finding their lifetime partners, and developing into the adults they are becoming. Transitional is their middle name.

Then what did we do? We put all three of these generations under one house and thought they would get along. What were we thinking?! So what you end up with is challenges and controversy. And people wonder why we take so many mini vacations to get away from it all? We are caught in the middle of all of it.

And on top of that, we are a generation of divorces and multiple relationships. We divorce, remarry, live together, combine families that aren’t blood related and expect it all to be just fine. We are the crazy ones in all this mess.

So in the end, we love, live, and make it all just a normal day.

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